A Community of Volunteers Serving Veterans, Military, and their Families

Leadership

Department of Alaska
Leadership Chairman - 2021-2022
Delores "Dee" Stokes Email: _______________

2019-2021 American Legion Auxiliary Leadership

Leadership is not about being in charge, it is about taking care of people in your charge.

Great leaders don't set out to be a leader. They set out to make a differance. It is never about the roll-it is always about the goal.

Waek leaders measure success by money, position and power. Strong leaders meaure success by the diffferance they make in people's lives.

“The growth and development of people is the highest calling of leadership.”

If we fail in our efforts to cultivate leadership ability, our leadership will deteriorate and

ultimately disappear. So where do we begin?

  • Build confidence in those you lead
  • Help people learn and develop. To increase members’ confidence, you should encourage them to utilize the Auxiliary Basics course www.ALAforVeterans.org) and the ALA Leadership Academy; and to attend ALA Mission Training or conferences held in their departments.
  • A great way to build up members’ competence—and thereby their confidence—is to delegate specific tasks that will help them grow in an area they’re interested in. Just be careful that you don’t delegate too soon or too quickly. Your job is to help members set reachable goals and, if necessary, to break difficult tasks into smaller, more manageable steps.
  • Focus on member’s strengths. Their confidence (and motivation) will generally grow when they’re given the chance to put their skills or expertise into practice.
  • Be supportive. One of the most fundamental ways to boost people’s confidence is to actively support them and build them up emotionally. When you get to know people on a more personal level (e.g., what motivates them; what really matters to them) you’ll intuitively know how to best support them. Treat all members with dignity and respect
  • Treat everyone with respect. Each of us has a direct impact on developing future leaders by setting an example for others to emulate.
  • Actively praise a member and provide positive feedback when someone does something well. We all like to feel appreciated and it takes so little to say, “Thanks, that was an awesome job you did!”
  • Build members up and let them know that it’s OK to make mistakes. When you remove the fear of failure, people will be more likely to take good risks. Challenge them.
  • Including others in projects or programs helps build emotional and creative capacity.
  • Leaders should inspire, challenge, enable and encourage members. They should mobilize others toward transforming our values into action, our vision into reality, and potential obstacles into innovations.
  • Empower members. Empowerment begins by painting the big-picture for those you lead. Empowerment also is all about trust.
  • Leaders should give opportunities to those they lead, and then hold them accountable.
  • Share with them past insecurities or challenges you faced when you first assumed a leadership role. Your openness will only make them feel more confident and inspired by your example.
  • Acknowledge past mistakes. People want to work with someone who is human. Listen and listen more
  • When building a member’s confidence, listening to them is crucial. Allow them to communicate openly and honestly about their strengths, weakness, fears, accomplishments, and ultimate goals.
  • Actively listen to what others have to say before giving your viewpoint. Demonstrate, by your actions, that their thoughts and ideas are important to you. Remember your reaction and body language is an important indicator that you are truly listening.
  • Connect with your members. Connection doesn’t happen unless you invest the time to learn about someone’s unique personality, perspective and motivations. Ask questions of members to uncover their interests, while observing them in action to find out their leadership strengths and potential.
  • Demonstrate your commitment to their success by consistently adding value to them, providing ongoing encouragement, and making yourself available.
  • Be a model they can emulate. Effective leaders should seize every opportunity to express, by their own example, their deep commitment to our organization. Leading by example makes our vision and our values tangible.
  • Effective leaders do what they say they will. This builds credibility and trust among members, who realize that their leaders' promises are not empty words.
  • Effective leaders are able to regroup and determine a new course when faced with adversity or an unexpected obstacle. They understand that needs and goals change over time and they must adapt to meet them.
  • Leaders take initiative and responsibility for their actions. "It takes a village to raise a child," is a popular African proverb. By the same token, it takes an organization to raise a leader. Developing leadership is a serious endeavor, but it's worth the time and effort because leaders are necessary for our organization to thrive into the future.
  • Invite new members to participate in meetings and events.

THINGS TO REMEMBER

  • Always greet new members and offer a new member packet.
  • Provide unit officers/board of directors contact information.
  • Unit leaders should encourage members to work their issues out directly with the parties involved rather than attempting to fix the situation by intervening.
  • Listen to what members have to say and thank them for their ideas.
  • Be open, rather than critical, of the ideas of others.
  • Assist in positive solutions to conflicts by focusing on the desired outcome.
  • Give praise and recognition when members do what is asked or go beyond what was expected.
  • Invite new members to participate in meetings and events.
  • Always greet new members and offer a new member packet.
  • Provide unit officers/board of directors contact information.
  • Unit leaders should encourage members to work their issues out directly with the parties involved rather than attempting to fix the situation by intervening.
  • Listen to what members have to say and thank them for their ideas.
  • Be open, rather than critical, of the ideas of others.
  • Assist in positive solutions to conflicts by focusing on the desired outcome.
  • Give praise and recognition when members do what is asked or go beyond what was expected.

Leadership Award:

Taking the time to share a favorite story about the positive impact you or someone you know has had on our mission is worth doing! It helps us tell the world who we are, what we do, and why we matter.

National Report and Awards:

Unit Award: Most Outstanding Unit Leadership Program

The National President’s Award for Excellence (NPAE) will be awarded to those who emphasize the national president’s focus through the American Legion Auxiliary’s programs.


Leadership Reporting:

Mid-Year Reports -- Due December 5, 2020. Each Unit LeadershipChairman is required to submit a narrative report by December 5, 2020 to the Department Leadership Chairman.

Year-End Reports -- Due April 15, 2021. Each Unit Leadership Chairman is required to submit a narrative report by April 15, 2021 to the Department Leadership Chairman.

 

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